Uma abordagem crítica da história da Palestina

HJELM, I. ; TAHA, H. ; PAPPE, I. ; THOMPSON, T. L. (eds.) A New Critical Approach to the History of Palestine: Palestine History and Heritage Project 1. Abingdon: Routledge, 2019, 400 p. – ISBN 9780367146375.  

HJELM, I. ; TAHA, H. ; PAPPE, I. ; THOMPSON, T. L. (eds.) A New Critical Approach to the History of Palestine: Palestine History and Heritage Project 1. Abingdon: Routledge, 2019

A New Critical Approach to the History of Palestine offers a comprehensive, evidence-based history of Palestine with a critical use of recent historical, archaeological and anthropological methods. This history is not an exclusive history, but one that is ethnically and culturally inclusive, a history of and for all peoples who have lived in Palestine. After an introductory essay offering a strategy for creating coherence and continuity from the earliest beginnings to the present, the volume presents twenty articles from 22 contributors, 16 of whom are of Middle Eastern origin or relation.

Split thematically into four parts, the volume discusses ideology, national identity and chronology in various historiographies of Palestine and the legacy of memory and oral history; the transient character of ethnicity in Palestine, and questions regarding the ethical responsibilities of archaeologists and historians to protect the multi-ethnic cultural heritage of Palestine; landscape and memory, and the values of community archaeology and bio-archaeology; and an exploration of the “ideology of the land” and its influence on Palestine’s history and heritage.

The first in a series of books under the auspices of the Palestine History and Heritage Project (PaHH), the volume offers a challenging new departure for writing the history of Palestine and Israel throughout the ages. A New Critical Approach to the History of Palestine explores the diverse history of the region against the backdrop of twentieth century scholarly construction of the history of Palestine as a history of a Jewish homeland, with roots in an ancient, biblical Israel, and examines the implications of this ancient and recent history for archaeology and cultural heritage. The book offers a fascinating new perspective for students and academics in the fields of anthropological, political, cultural and biblical history.

Publicação prevista para junho de 2019.

Jesus e os fariseus

Jesus e os fariseus - Uma reavaliação interdisciplinar  - Conferência Internacional - 7 a 9 de maio de 2019

Jesus e os fariseus – Uma reavaliação interdisciplinar

Conferência Internacional – 7 a 9 de maio de 2019

Por ocasião do 110º Aniversário da Fundação do Instituto Bíblico, 7 de maio de 1909

A conferência internacional Jesus and the Pharisees: Uma reavaliação interdisciplinar reúne estudiosos judeus, protestantes, católicos e outros da Argentina, Áustria, Canadá, Colômbia, Alemanha, Índia, Israel, Itália, Holanda e Estados Unidos.

A conferência primeiro trata das possíveis origens e dos significados do nome “fariseu” em diferentes idiomas. Em seguida, examina as várias fontes antigas sobre os fariseus (Josefo, Qumran, dados arqueológicos, o Novo Testamento e a literatura rabínica).

Após uma mesa-redonda sobre os resultados relativos aos fariseus “históricos”, a segunda parte da conferência será dedicada à Wirkungsgeschichte (história da interpretação e seus efeitos), da literatura patrística às interpretações judaicas medievais, passando pelas representações teatrais da Paixão, filmes, livros de religião e homilética. No final, trataremos das possíveis maneiras de representar os fariseus de forma menos inadequada no futuro.

Conferencistas:

  • Harold ATTRIDGE Yale University, USA
  • Philip CUNNINGHAM St. Joseph’s University, USA
  • Yair FURSTENBERG Hebrew University, Jerusalém, Israel
  • Juan Manuel GRANADOS Pontifical Biblical Institute, Roma, Itália
  • Massimo GRILLI Pontifical Gregorian University, Roma, Itália
  • Angela LA DELFA University of Maryland University College, USA
  • Amy-Jill LEVINE Vanderbilt University, USA
  • Hermut LÖHR Universität Bonn, Alemanha
  • Steve MASON Rijksuniversiteit Groningen, Holanda
  • Eric MEYERS Duke University, USA
  • Craig MORRISON Pontifical Biblical Institute, Roma, Itália
  • Vered NOAM Tel Aviv University, Israel
  • Henry PATTARUMADATHIL Pontifical Biblical Institute, Roma, Itália
  • Adele REINHARTZ University of Ottawa, Canadá
  • Rabbi David ROSEN AJC (American Jewish Committee), Jerusalém
  • Jens SCHRÖTER Humboldt-Universität Berlin, Alemanha
  • Matthias SKEB, Pontifical Gregorian University, Roma, Itália
  • Rabbi Abraham SKORKA St. Joseph’s University, USA
  • Günter STEMBERGER Universität Wien, Áustria
  • Christian STÜCKL Artistic Director of Münchner Volkstheater & Oberammergau Passion Play, Alemanha
  • Adela YARBRO COLLINS Yale University, USA

A conferência, em inglês, será transmitida ao vivo pela Internet e, posteriormente, disponibilizada no YouTube.

Na manhã de quinta-feira, 9 de maio, uma audiência especial com o Papa Francisco foi organizada para os participantes devidamente registrados para toda a conferência.

Faça o download da programação em pdf.

Jesus and the Pharisees – An Interdisciplinary Reappraisal

International Conference – May 7-9, 2019

On the Occasion of the 110th Anniversary of the Biblical Institute’s Founding, May 7, 1909

The international conference Jesus and the Pharisees: An Interdisciplinary Reappraisal brings together Jewish, Protestant, Catholic, and other scholars from Argentina, Austria, Canada, Colombia, Germany, India, Israel, Italy, Netherlands, and the United States.

The conference first deals with the possible origins and meanings of the name “Pharisee” in different languages. It then examines the various ancient sources about the Pharisees (Josephus, Qumran, archaeological data, the New Testament, and Rabbinic Literature).

After a round table discussion of the results concerning the “historical” Pharisees, the second part of the conference will be devoted to the Wirkungsgeschichte (history of interpretation and its effects), from Patristic Literature, to Medieval Jewish interpretations, to Passion Plays, the Movies, Religion Text Books, and Homiletics. In the end, we will look at possible ways to represent the Pharisees less inadequately in the future.

Speakers:

  • Harold ATTRIDGE Yale University
  • Philip CUNNINGHAM St. Joseph’s University
  • Yair FURSTENBERG Hebrew University, Jerusalem
  • Juan Manuel GRANADOS Pontifical Biblical Institute
  • Massimo GRILLI Pontifical Gregorian University
  • Angela LA DELFA University of Maryland University College
  • Amy-Jill LEVINE Vanderbilt University
  • Hermut LÖHR Universität Bonn
  • Steve MASON Rijksuniversiteit Groningen
  • Eric MEYERS Duke University
  • Craig MORRISON Pontifical Biblical Institute
  • Vered NOAM Tel Aviv University
  • Henry PATTARUMADATHIL Pontifical Biblical Institute
  • Adele REINHARTZ University of Ottawa
  • Rabbi David ROSEN AJC (American Jewish Committee)
  • Jens SCHRÖTER Humboldt-Universität Berlin
  • Matthias SKEB, Pontifical Gregorian University
  • Rabbi Abraham SKORKA St. Joseph’s University
  • Günter STEMBERGER Universität Wien
  • Christian STÜCKL Artistic Director of Münchner Volkstheater & Oberammergau Passion Play
  • Adela YARBRO COLLINS Yale University

The entire conference will be held in English, except for the concluding session on Thursday, May 9 at 6:00 pm, where simultaneous translation into Italian and English will be available.

The conference will be web streamed live and subsequently uploaded on YouTube.

In the morning of Thursday, May 9, a special audience with Pope Francis has been arranged for participants duly registered for the entire conference.

Download PDF – Event Schedule

Il convegno internazionale “Gesù e i Farisei. Un riesame interdisciplinare” che si terrà dal 7 al 9 maggio presso il Pontificio Istituto Biblico (PIB) in occasione dei 110 anni di fondazione, “unisce ebrei, protestanti, cattolici e studiosi proventi da Argentina, Austria, Canada, Colombia, Germania, India, Israele, Italia, Paesi Bassi e Stati Uniti”. Così Joseph Sievers, docente dell’Istituto, presentando questa mattina l’evento che, spiega, affronterà prima di tutto le possibili origini e significati del nome “fariseo” in diverse lingue. Dopo una tavola rotonda sui risultati riguardo i farisei “storici”, la seconda parte della conferenza sarà dedicata alla storia dell’interpretazione dei farisei e i suoi effetti a partire dalla letteratura patristica fino alle rappresentazioni teatrali della Passione (Passion plays), ai film, ai libri di testo religiosi, e all’omiletica. “Infine – conclude Sievers -, cercheremo nuovi modi di rappresentare, in futuro, i farisei in maniera meno inadeguata” (Agenzia S.I.R. – 3 aprile 2019)

Livro de Israel Finkelstein sobre Esdras, Neemias e Crônicas

FINKELSTEIN, I. Hasmonean Realities behind Ezra, Nehemiah, and Chronicles: Archaeological and Historical Perspectives. Atlanta: SBL Press, 2018, 222 p. – ISBN 9780884143079.

FINKELSTEIN, I. Hasmonean Realities behind Ezra, Nehemiah, and Chronicles: Archaeological and Historical Perspectives. Atlanta: SBL Press, 2018, 222 p.

 
In this collection of essays, Israel Finkelstein deals with key topics in Ezra, Nehemiah, and 1 and 2 Chronicles, such as the list of returnees, the construction of the city wall of Jerusalem, the adversaries of Nehemiah, the tribal genealogies, and the territorial expansion of Judah in 2 Chronicles. Finkelstein argues that the geographical and historical realities cached behind at least parts of these books fit the Hasmonean period in the late second century BCE. Seven previously published essays are supplemented by maps, updates to the archaeological material, and references to recent publications on the topics.

Entre 2008 e 2015 Israel Finkelstein publicou 7 artigos nos quais abordou textos dos livros de Esdras, Neemias e 1 e 2 Crônicas. Estes textos falam da lista dos que voltaram do exílio babilônico, da construção das muralhas de Jerusalém, dos adversários de Neemias, das genealogias tribais e da expansão territorial de Judá. Finkelstein argumenta que a realidade geográfica e histórica que aparece em pelo menos parte desses livros aponta para a época dos Macabeus, no final do século II a.C. Reunidos neste livros, os sete ensaios são complementados por mapas, material arqueológico atualizado e referências a publicações recentes sobre os tópicos tratados.

Introduction
Over the last decade, I published seven articles concerning texts in the books of Ezra, Nehemiah, and Chronicles. They deal with the construction of Jerusalem’s city wall, described in Neh 3; the lists of returnees in Ezra 2:1–67 and Neh 7:6–68; the adversaries of Nehemiah; the genealogies in 1 Chr 2–9; the towns fortified by Rehoboam according to 2 Chr 11:5–12; and the unparallel accounts in 2 Chronicles that relate the expansion of Judah. An additional article gives an overview of the territorial extent of Yehud/Judea in the Persian and Hellenistic periods.

1. Jerusalem in the Persian (and Early Hellenistic) Period and the Wall of Nehemiah
Knowledge of the archaeology of Jerusalem in the Persian (and early Hellenistic) period—the size of the settlement and whether it was fortified—is crucial to understanding the history of the province of Yehud, the reality behind the book of Nehemiah, and the process of compilation and redaction of certain biblical texts. It is therefore essential to look at the finds free of preconceptions (which may stem from the account in the book of Nehemiah) and only then attempt to merge archaeology and text.

2. Archaeology and the List of Returnees in the Books of Ezra and Nehemiah
In the first chapter I questioned Neh 3’s description of the construction of the Jerusalem wall in the light of the archaeology of Jerusalem in the Persian period. The finds indicate that the settlement was small and poor. It covered an area of circa 2–2.5 hectares and was inhabited by four hundred–five hundred people. The archaeology of Jerusalem shows no evidence for construction of a wall in the Persian period or renovation of the ruined Iron II city wall. I concluded with three alternatives for understanding the discrepancy between the biblical text and the archaeological finds…

3. The Territorial Extent and Demography of Yehud/Judea in the Persian and Early Hellenistic Periods
The territorial extent of Persian-period Yehud and Hellenistic Judea and estimates of their population are major issues in current research, with far-reaching implications for dating the composition of several biblical works. Recent research on the Yehud seal impressions and my own work on geographical lists in the books of Ezra and Nehemiah raise new questions and call for a fresh treatment of both issues.

4. Nehemiah’s Adversaries
In chapters 1 and 2, I proposed to identify the geographical, archaeological, and historical realities behind the list of builders of the wall in Neh 3:1–32 and the list of returnees in Neh 7:6–68 (and Ezra 2:1–67) in Hasmonean times. Placing the Neh 3 list in the Hellenistic period should not affect the dating of the Nehemiah Memoir—the backbone of the book. Construction of the wall is a major theme in the Nehemiah Memoir. The reality behind it may be sought in work conducted on the original mound of Jerusalem, which was located on the Temple…

5. The Historical Reality behind the Genealogical Lists in 1 Chronicles
The genealogical lists of “the sons of Israel” in 1 Chr 2–9 have been the focus of intensive research from the beginning of modern biblical scholarship. Among other topics, research has centered on the origin of the lists, their purpose, their relationship to other parts of the books of Chronicles and their date. Most scholars agree that the genealogical lists form an independent block, a kind of introduction to history; opinions differ, however, on whether the lists belong to the work of the Chronicler or if they were added after the main substance of the book had already been…

6. Rehoboam’s Fortified Cities (2 Chr 11:5–12)
A list of cities ostensibly fortified by Rehoboam appears in 2 Chr 11:5–12, with no parallel in the book of Kings. Many scholars have dealt with this short account, in efforts to establish its date, geographical setting, and place in the Chronicler’s description of the reign of Rehoboam. Regarding chronology, researchers have suggested dating the list to the time of Rehoboam, as related in the text, or to a later date in the history of Judah: the days of Hezekiah or Josiah. Regarding the geographical background, scholars have attempted to understand the function of the towns mentioned in the…

7. The Expansion of Judah in 2 Chronicles
The land of Israel and territorial gains and losses are major themes in Chronicles. The period of David and Solomon is conceived as the ideal rule of Jerusalem over the entire area inhabited by the Hebrews. After the “division” of the monarchy, 2 Chronicles pays much attention to the gradual territorial growth of Judah, aimed at restoring Jerusalem’s rule over the entire land of Israel. This expansion—undertaken during the reign of a few monarchs—is described in several sections that do not appear in the books of Kings. Scholars have been divided on the historical reliability of these “unparallel”…

Conclusions
The geographical setting portrayed by the texts discussed in this book and the archaeology of the sites mentioned in them reflect realities in the second half of the second century BCE—in Hasmonean times. The literary genre of these materials and the ideology behind them also fit Hasmonean literature. The main conclusions of the seven chapters are as follows. Nehemiah’s Wall: There are no Persian or early Hellenistic fortifications in Jerusalem to fit the Neh 3 description of a city wall with numerous gates and towers surrounding a large city. Furthermore, the depleted population of Yehud could not have supported…

Israel Finkelstein

The original articles included in this book are listed below in the order in which they appear here:

“Jerusalem in the Persian (and Early Hellenistic) Period and the Wall of Nehemiah.” JSOT 32 (2008): 501–20.

“Archaeology of the List of Returnees in the Books of Ezra and Nehemiah.” PEQ 140 (2008): 7–16.

“The Territorial Extent and Demography of Yehud/Judea in thePersian and Early Hellenistic Periods.” RB 117 (2010): 39–54.

“Nehemiah’s Adversaries: A Hasmonaean Reality?” Transeu 47(2015): 47–55.

“The Historical Reality behind the Genealogical Lists in 1 Chronicles.” JBL 131 (2012): 65–83.

“Rehoboam’s Fortified Cities (II Chr 11, 5–12): A Hasmonean Reality?” ZAW 123 (2011): 92–107.

“The Expansion of Judah in II Chronicles: Territorial Legitimation for the Hasmoneans?” ZAW 127 (2015): 669–95.

Israel Finkelstein trata do mesmo assunto em um seminário, em setembro de 2018, na Faculdade Teológica de Zurique, Suíça. Disponível em vídeo, com legendas em inglês:

Hasmonean Realities behind Ezra, Nehemiah and Chronicles? The Archeological Perspective – Seminar von Prof. Dr. Israel Finkelstein an der Theologischen Fakultät Zürich. 13. September 2018.

Leia Mais:
Israel Finkelstein na Ayrton’s Biblical Page e no Observatório Bíblico

Alexandre Magno foi morto pela síndrome de Guillain-Barré?

Até hoje há muitas dúvidas sobre a causa da morte de Alexandre Magno. Malária? Assassinato? Agora surge mais uma hipótese: a síndrome de Guillain-Barré.

Alexandre Magno (356-323 a.C.)

Why Alexander the Great May Have Been Declared Dead Prematurely (It’s Pretty Gruesome)

By Owen Jarus – Live Science – February 4, 2019

Alexander the Great may have been killed by Guillain-Barré syndrome, a rare neurological condition in which a person’s own immune system attacks them, says one medical researchers.

The condition may have led to a mistaken declaration of the king’s death and may explain the mysterious phenomenon in which his body didn’t decay for seven days after his “death.”

Alexander the Great was king of Macedonia between 336 and 323 B.C. During that time, he conquered an empire that stretched from the Balkans to modern-day Pakistan. In June 323, he was living in Babylon when, after a brief illness that caused fever and paralysis, he died at age 32. His senior generals then fought each other to see who would succeed him. [Top 10 Reasons Alexander the Great Was, Well … Great!]

According to accounts left by ancient historians, after a night of drinking, the king experienced a fever and gradually became less and less able to move until he could no longer speak. One account, told by Quintus Curtius Rufus, who lived during the first century A.D., claims that Alexander the Great’s body didn’t decay for more than seven days after he was declared dead, and the embalmers were hesitant to work on his body.

Ancient historians reported that many people believed that Alexander the Great was poisoned, possibly by someone working for Antipater, a senior official of Alexander’s who was supposedly quarreling with the king. In 2014, a research team found that the medicinal plant white hellebore (Veratrum album) could have been used to poison Alexander.

Based on the symptoms recorded by ancient historians, Katherine Hall, a senior lecturer in the Department of General Practice and Rural Health at the University of Otago in New Zealand, believes that it’s possible that Alexander actually died of Guillain-Barré syndrome. The condition, Hall said, may have left Alexander in a deep coma that may have led doctors to declare, mistakenly, that he was dead, something that would explain why his corpse supposedly didn’t decompose quickly, noted Hall in her paper published recently in the journal Ancient History Bulletin (continua).

Sobre Alexandre Magno, clique aqui. Sobre a síndrome de Guillain-Barré, clique aqui.

História de Israel II 2019

Este curso de História de Israel II compreende 2 horas semanais, com duração de um semestre, o segundo dos oito semestres do curso de Teologia. Os alunos recebem os roteiros de todas as minhas disciplinas do ano em curso nos formatos pdf e html. Os sistemas de avaliação e aprendizagem seguem as normas da Faculdade e são, dentro do espaço permitido, combinados com os alunos no começo do curso.

I. Ementa
Discute com o aluno os elementos necessários para uma compreensão global e essencial da história econômica, política e social do povo israelita, como base para um aprofundamento maior da história teológica desse povo. Possibilita ao aluno uma reflexão séria sobre o processo histórico de Israel do exílio babilônico ao domínio romano.

II. Objetivos
Oferece ao aluno um quadro coerente da História de Israel e discute as tendências atuais da pesquisa na área. Constrói uma base de conhecimentos histórico-sociais necessários ao aluno para que possa situar no seu contexto a literatura bíblica veterotestamentária produzida no período.

III. Conteúdo Programático
1. O exílio babilônico

2. O judaísmo pós-exílico

2.1. O domínio persa

2.2. O domínio grego

2.3. O domínio romano

IV. Bibliografia
Básica
FINKELSTEIN, I. ; SILBERMAN, N. A. A Bíblia desenterrada: A nova visão arqueológica do antigo Israel e das origens dos seus textos sagrados. Petrópolis: Vozes, 2018.

LIVERANI, M. Para além da Bíblia: História antiga de Israel. São Paulo: Loyola/Paulus, 2008.

PIXLEY, J. A história de Israel a partir dos pobres. 11. ed. Petrópolis: Vozes, 2013.

Complementar
DA SILVA, A. J. A história de Israel no debate atual. Artigo na Ayrton’s Biblical Page. Última atualização: 24.10.2018.

DA SILVA, A. J. Apocalíptica: busca de um tempo sem fronteiras. Artigo na Ayrton’s Biblical Page. Última atualização: 17.05.2015.

DA SILVA, A. J. Flávio Josefo, homem singular em uma sociedade plural. Artigo na Ayrton’s Biblical Page. Última atualização: 03.12.2016.

DA SILVA, A. J. História de Israel. Texto na Ayrton’s Biblical Page. Última atualização: 24.01.2019.

DA SILVA, A. J. Leitura socioantropológica do Livro de Rute. Estudos Bíblicos, Petrópolis, n. 98, p. 107-120, 2008. Artigo na Ayrton’s Biblical Page. Última atualização: 27.10.2017.

DA SILVA. A. J. Os essênios: a racionalização da solidariedade. Artigo na Ayrton’s Biblical Page. Última atualização: 10.06.2018.

DA SILVA, A. J. Pode uma ‘história de Israel’ ser escrita? Observando o debate atual sobre a história de Israel. Artigo na Ayrton’s Biblical Page. Última atualização: 10.08.2015.

DA SILVA, A. J. Religião e formação de classes na antiga Judeia. Estudos Bíblicos, Petrópolis, n. 120, p. 413-434, 2013.
 
DONNER, H. História de Israel e dos povos vizinhos. 2v. 7. ed. São Leopoldo: Sinodal/EST, 2017.

GERSTENBERGER, E. S. Israel in the Persian Period: The Fifth and Fourth Centuries B.C.E. Atlanta: Society of Biblical Literature, 2011, 594 p. – ISBN 9781589832657. Disponível online.

GERSTENBERGER, E. S. Israel no tempo dos persas: Séculos V e IV antes de Cristo. São Paulo: Loyola, 2014.

HORSLEY, R. A. Arqueologia, história e sociedade na Galileia: o contexto social de Jesus e dos Rabis. São Paulo: Paulus, 2000 [2a. reimpressão: 2017].

HORSLEY, R. A. Jesus e a espiral da violência: Resistência judaica popular na Palestina Romana. São Paulo: Paulus, 2010.

KIPPENBERG, H. G. Religião e formação de classes na antiga Judeia: estudo sociorreligioso sobre a relação entre tradição e evolução social. São Paulo: Paulus, 1997. Resumo no Observatório Bíblico – 19 de julho de 2007.

STEGEMANN, W. Jesus e seu tempo. São Leopoldo: Sinodal/EST, 2013.

Leia Mais:
Preparando meus programas de aula de 2019
História de Israel I 2019
Hebraico Bíblico 2019
Pentateuco 2019
Literatura Deuteronomista 2019
Literatura Profética I 2019
Literatura Profética II 2019

História de Israel I 2019

Este curso de História de Israel I compreende 2 horas semanais, com duração de um semestre, o primeiro dos oito semestres do curso de Teologia. Os alunos recebem os roteiros de todas as minhas disciplinas do ano em curso nos formatos pdf e html. Os sistemas de avaliação e aprendizagem seguem as normas da Faculdade e são, dentro do espaço permitido, combinados com os alunos no começo do curso.

I. Ementa
Discute com o aluno os elementos necessários para uma compreensão global e essencial da história econômica, política e social do povo israelita, como base para um aprofundamento maior da história teológica desse povo. Possibilita ao aluno uma reflexão séria sobre o processo histórico de Israel desde suas origens até o exílio babilônico.

II. Objetivos
Oferece ao aluno um quadro coerente da História de Israel e discute as tendências atuais da pesquisa na área. Constrói uma base de conhecimentos histórico-sociais necessários ao aluno para que possa situar no seu contexto a literatura bíblica veterotestamentária produzida no período.

III. Conteúdo Programático
1. Noções de geografia do Antigo Oriente Médio

2. As origens de Israel

3. A monarquia tributária israelita

3.1. Os governos de Saul, Davi e Salomão

3.2. O reino de Israel

3.3. O reino de Judá

IV. Bibliografia
Básica
FINKELSTEIN, I. ; SILBERMAN, N. A. A Bíblia desenterrada: A nova visão arqueológica do antigo Israel e das origens dos seus textos sagrados. Petrópolis: Vozes, 2018.

LIVERANI, M. Para além da Bíblia: História antiga de Israel. São Paulo: Loyola/Paulus, 2008.

PIXLEY, J. A história de Israel a partir dos pobres. 11. ed. Petrópolis: Vozes, 2013.

Complementar
DA SILVA, A. J. A História Antiga de Israel no Brasil: três opiniões. Observatório Bíblico – 17 de outubro de 2013.

DA SILVA, A. J. A história de Israel na pesquisa atual. In: História de Israel e as pesquisas mais recentes. 2. ed. Petrópolis: Vozes, 2003, p. 43-87.

DA SILVA, A. J. A história de Israel na pesquisa atual. Estudos Bíblicos, Petrópolis, n. 71, p. 62-74, 2001.
 
DA SILVA, A. J. A história de Israel no debate atual. Artigo na Ayrton’s Biblical Page. Última atualização: 24.10.2018.

DA SILVA, A. J. A origem dos antigos Estados israelitas. Estudos Bíblicos, Petrópolis, n. 78, p. 18-31, 2003.

DA SILVA, A. J. História de Israel. Texto na Ayrton’s Biblical Page. Última atualização: 24.01.2019.

DA SILVA, A. J. O Pentateuco e a História de Israel. In: Teologia na pós-modernidade. Abordagens epistemológica, sistemática e teórico-prática. São Paulo: Paulinas, 2007, p. 173-215.

DA SILVA, A. J. Pode uma ‘história de Israel’ ser escrita? Observando o debate atual sobre a história de Israel. Artigo na Ayrton’s Biblical Page. Última atualização: 10.08.2015.

DAVIES, P. R. In Search of ‘Ancient Israel’. 2. ed. London: Bloomsbury T & T Clark, [1992] 2015.

DONNER, H. História de Israel e dos povos vizinhos. 2v. 7. ed. São Leopoldo: Sinodal/EST, 2017.

FINKELSTEIN, I. O reino esquecido: arqueologia e história de Israel Norte. São Paulo: Paulus, 2015.

FINKELSTEIN, I. The Forgotten Kingdom: The Archaeology and History of Northern Israel. Atlanta: Society of Biblical Literature, 2013. Disponível online.

FINKELSTEIN, I.; MAZAR, A. The Quest for the Historical Israel: Debating Archaeology and the History of Early Israel. Atlanta: Society of Biblical Literature, 2007. Disponível online.

GOTTWALD, N. K. As Tribos de Iahweh: Uma Sociologia da Religião de Israel Liberto, 1250-1050 a.C. 2. ed. São Paulo: Paulus, 2004.

KAEFER, J. A. A Bíblia, a arqueologia e a história de Israel e Judá. São Paulo: Paulus, 2015 [1. reimpressão: 2018].

KAEFER, J. A. Arqueologia das terras da Bíblia. São Paulo: Paulus, 2012 [2. reimpressão: 2018].

KAEFER, J. A. Arqueologia das terras da Bíblia II. São Paulo: Paulus, 2016.

KESSLER, R. História social do antigo Israel. 2. ed. São Paulo: Paulinas, 2010.

MORGENSZTERN, I.; RAGOBERT, T. A Bíblia e seu tempo – um olhar arqueológico sobre o Antigo Testamento. 2 DVDs. Documentário baseado no livro The Bible Unearthed [A Bíblia desenterrada], de Israel Finkelstein e Neil Asher Silberman. São Paulo: História Viva – Duetto Editorial, 2007.

Leia Mais:
Preparando meus programas de aula para 2019
História de Israel II 2019
Hebraico Bíblico 2019
Pentateuco 2019
Literatura Deuteronomista 2019
Literatura Profética I 2019
Literatura Profética II 2019

Relógio babilônico

Os babilônios usavam dois tipos diferentes de unidades de tempo: o primeiro era definido por fenômenos homogêneos (ou seja, sempre o mesmo comprimento), fossem astronômicos (surgimento de uma estrela ou movimento de um corpo celeste) ou físicos (relógio de água); o segundo era um sistema sazonal em que a duração de uma hora muda dependendo da duração da luz do dia. Este relógio mostra seu horário local usando um sistema babilônico de horas sazonais.

Babylonian Hours

This clock shows you your local time computed using a Babylonian system of seasonal hours. There are two different types of units of time in the Babylonian system, the first is set by homogeneous phenomena (i.e. always the same length), either astronomical (appearance of a star or movement of a celestial body) or physical (water clock), the second is a seasonal system whereby the length of an hour changes depending on the length of daylight. The Babylonians used multiple methods for measuring the passage of time throughout the day, a common system was dividing the 24-day up into 12 “double”-hours (bēru), these units of time were equivalent to 30° of the sun’s movement around the earth (360° divided by 12 is 30°). This clock (somewhat anachronistically) makes use of both fixed and seasonal units of time.

This clock uses a system of time calculation from 2,500 years ago used by the Babylonians in ancient Mesopotamia. The time is based on the concept of a seasonal hour, i.e. the length of an hour is seasonal and depends on the duration of daylight in your current location. This website grabs your location and computes your local time in this Babylonian system. Obviously, the ancient Babylonians did not have digital clocks, so this clock takes a few liberties with how it displays the data, if you want to know more about the calculations and ancient Babylonian units of time continue reading below.

If you’re just curious how to read this clock, the first number is the hour past sunrise or sunset (depending on day or night), the second is a unit called an which counts up from zero to a maximum of 16 for your current location, the third number is a unit called gar for which there are 60 in an , the acronym at the end refers to a named quarter of the 24-hour day.

Leia Mais:
Histórias de criação e dilúvio na antiga Mesopotâmia
Histórias do Antigo Oriente Médio: uma bibliografia
Histórias do Antigo Oriente Médio: alguns recursos online

A História de Israel e Judá na pesquisa atual V

:. A História de Israel e Judá na pesquisa atual I
:. A História de Israel e Judá na pesquisa atual II
:. A História de Israel e Judá na pesquisa atual III
:. A História de Israel e Judá na pesquisa atual IV
:. A História de Israel e Judá na pesquisa atual V

TOBOLOWSKY, A. Israelite and Judahite History in Contemporary Theoretical Approaches. Currents in Biblical Research, Vol. 17(1), 2018, p. 33-58.

Este artigo de Andrew Tobolowsky, História israelita e judaíta em abordagens acadêmicas contemporâneas, analisa a evolução do estudo das histórias de Israel e Judá, com ênfase nos últimos dez anos. Durante esse período, tem havido um interesse crescente em evidências extrabíblicas como o principal meio de construir histórias abrangentes, e um renascimento do interesse em teorias pós-modernas. Este estudo oferece uma discussão geral sobre as tendências da última década, considerando a possibilidade dos autores judaítas só terem assumido uma identidade israelita após a queda de Israel [= reino do norte]. Depois de mostrar as principais tendências nos estudos da Bíblia e da História de Israel de modo genérico, o autor aborda o período pré-monárquico, a monarquia unida, os dois reinos de Israel e Judá e o exílio babilônico e, por fim, a época persa.

This article surveys developments in the study of the histories of ancient Israel and Judah with a focus on the last ten years. Over that period there has been an increased focus on extrabiblical evidence, over biblical text, as the primary means of constructing comprehensive histories, and a revival of interest in post-modern and linguistic-turn theories with respect to establishing what kinds of histories should be written. This study offers a general discussion of the last decade’s trends; an inquiry into the possibility that Judahite authors only assumed an Israelite identity after the fall of Israel; and an era-by-era investigation of particular developments in how scholars think about the various traditional periods of Israelite and Judahite history. The latter inquiry spans the pre-monarchical period to the Persian period.

Andrew Tobolowsky: Visiting Assistant Professor at the College of William and Mary in Williamsburg, Virginia, USA.

Sempre que o assunto tiver sido tratado em minha página, Ayrton’s Biblical Page, ou neste blog, Observatório Bíblico, colocarei um link. As principais obras citadas terão links para a Amazon.com.br. O texto em português é um resumo e uma tradução livre minha. O texto em inglês na parte final do post é citação do artigo. A publicação será feita em 5 postagens.

DAVIES, P. R. ; RÖMER, T. (eds.) Writing the Bible: Scribes, Scribalism and Script. Abingdon: Routledge, 2014, 224 p.

5. A época persa – The Persian Period and Beyond

A época persa tem sido extensamente reavaliada nos estudos da última década. Se há uma mudança de paradigma nos estudos, é aqui que ela acontece. Propostas estão sendo abandonadas, como a de uma “revolução religiosa” no Yehud ou, pelo menos parcialmente, a teoria da Autorização Imperial Persa. Estas propostas podem ser conferidas em E. Stern, 1999, 2006, 2010; Christian Frevel et alii, 2014; James W. Watts, 2001.

Constata-se que na época persa surgiu um significativo interesse pelo passado, presente na visão bíblica da história que então se desenvolveu. Assim, têm sido publicados muitos estudos recentes sobre o período persa, considerado como época crucial para a formação textual de todos os tipos, incluindo o Tetrateuco, Pentateuco, Hexateuco e Eneateuco, bem como de outros materiais que tentam pensar a identidade judaica.

Por exemplo: Erhard Blum, em T.B. Dozeman ; K. Schmid (eds.), A Farewell to the Yahwist? The Composition of the Pentateuch in Recent European Interpretation (2006) e em  T. B. Dozeman ; T. Römer ; K. Schmid (eds.), Pentateuch, Hexateuch or Enneateuch? Identifying Literary Works in Genesis through Kings (2011); J. C. Gertz, em T. B. Dozeman ; K. Schmid (eds.), A Farewell to the Yahwist? The Composition of the Pentateuch in Recent European Interpretation (2006); Thomas Römer, em Joel S. Baden (ed.), The Strata of the Priestly Writings: Contemporary Debate and Future Directions (2009); Konrad Schmid, 2007, 2012a e 2012b; Thomas Römer & M.Z. Brettler, 2000; E. Ben Zvi, 2011; David S. Vanderhooft, 2011; J. Berquist, 2006.

A Obra do Cronista também tem sido reavaliada. O Cronista sempre foi relegado a segundo plano, quando comparado com a Obra Histórica Deuteronomista quanto à sua peculiar reconstrução histórica. Mas hoje, como sugere E. Ben Zvi, em 2009, podemos avaliar o seu poderoso senso de centralidade “etnocultural”, que parece ter sido uma característica da época persa. O Cronista queria apresentar aos seus leitores uma visão diferente da perspectiva Deuteronomista. Por isso suas divergências.

Outros chamam a atenção para os erros e contradições do livro de Esdras, ao mesmo tempo em que defendem a historicidade das memórias de Neemias (Ne 1,1-7,5; 12-13). Assim, Lester L. Grabbe, 1998; David M. Carr, 2011; J. Blenkinsopp, em James W. Watts (ed.), Persia and Torah: The Theory of Imperial Authorization of the Pentateuch (2001).

Tudo isso nos mostra que, para compreendermos a reconstrução pós-exílica, devemos olhar menos o período imediato após a ascensão de Ciro, no século VI a.C., e muito mais o final da época persa, ou seja, o final do século V e o começo do seculo IV a.C. Nesta época é que teria ocorrido a “recuperação” do passado de Israel pelos autores bíblicos.

Observa-se, então, que os principais estudos da época persa não buscam a descoberta de novos dados, embora isto também tenha ocorrido, mas a interpretação de dados já conhecidos com métodos mais adequados. Como observa Ian D. Wilson, em 2016, a questão não é se alguns corpora bíblicos contêm material que remonta à Idade do Ferro, o que já foi demonstrado, mas como este material está representado nas formas discursivas pós-monárquicas. O que parece ser urgente é a construção de um modelo mais eficaz que consiga relacionar a história das tradições bíblicas com a construção de sua narrativa em um tempo determinado por um limitado grupo de atores.

Neste sentido trabalha K. L. Noll, em 2008, quando questiona o alcance das tradições bíblicas: em que proporção as tradições bíblicas chegaram às pessoas que viveram naquela época e naquela região? Parece cada vez mais claro, por exemplo, que muitas tradições nunca chegaram em Elefantina. Philip R. Davies e Thomas Römer, em 2014, também discutiram isso. Os ensaios desta obra tratam da divulgação de textos, da formação de livros e cânones e dos efeitos sociais e políticos da escrita e do conhecimento textual. As questões centrais discutidas incluem o status do escriba, a natureza da “autoria”, a relação entre copiar e redigir e o status relativo do conhecimento oral e escrito.

Quanto tempo demorou para a Bíblia se tornar, não apenas canônica, mas “sagrada”? Quer dizer: tratada com o respeito devido às Escrituras como autoridade última e como algo que não poderia mais ser alterado. Datas limites para a canonização têm sido apresentadas de maneira consistente, mas a questão da “sacralidade” está apenas começando a ser tratada. Michael L. Satlow, em 2014, aborda isso.

Os estudos de Eva Mroczek, de 2015 e 2016, sobre a cultura literária extrabíblica, em épocas em que tipicamente se presumia uma “hegemonia do bíblico”, são importantes. Thomas Römer também estudou, em 2012, a relação entre as narrativas bíblicas e o mundo mais vasto dos textos judaicos posteriores.

No último parágrafo do artigo, Andrew Tobolowsky nos diz que estes estudos não apenas descrevem o que está sendo pesquisado sobre a época persa e sua literatura, mas nos indicam o rumo que as pesquisas estão tomando. Devemos continuar enfrentando estas questões, tentando descobrir o que significa uma visão bíblica de história criada em um contexto específico por um conjunto específico de razões. E são diferentes interpretações de uma mesma história. Mais: histórias que levaram algum tempo para se tornar um relato significativo das vivências de Israel. Conhecer isso determinará o modo como contaremos a história, ou melhor, as histórias de Israel. Isto está apenas começando. 

SATLOW, M. How the Bible Became Holy. New Haven: Yale University Press, 2014, 416 p.

No period in the traditional sequence of biblical history has undergone a greater paradigm shift in the last decade than the Persian period. While various more dramatic proposals about it seem to have been largely set aside (e.g., Stern’s theory of a ‘Religious Revolution’ in Yehud and to a certain degree the so-called Persian Imperial Authorization theory [Stern 1999; 2006; 2010; Frevel, Psychny, and Cornelius 2014; Watts 2001]), many of the relevant developments have to do with reassessments of what has actually long been visible.

It now seems likely that the late Persian period did feature the kind of revival of interest in the ancient Israelite past that might explain its importance as the locus in which the biblical vision of history finally emerged (Lipschits and Vanderhooft 2006, 2014; Vanderhooft 2011: 540; Frevel and Pyschny 2014; Leith 2014; Bocher and Lipschits 2013; Wyssmann 2014). There have therefore been a number of studies recently on the Persian period as the crucial site for textual formation of all sorts, including of the Tetrateuch, Pentateuch, Hexateuch, and Enneateuch, as well of other materials focused on the formation of familiar biblical ways of thinking about ethnic identity at that time (Blum 2006; 2011; Gertz 2006; Römer 2009; Schmid 2007, 2012a, 2012b; Römer and Brettler 2000; Ben Zvi 2011a, 2011b; Knoppers 2001, 2003; Vanderhooft 2011; Berquist 2006).

Indeed, as Ben Zvi (2009: 60) suggests, the composition of Chronicles, Ezra, and Nehemiah may even have been motivated by an explicit desire ‘to shape, communicate, and encourage its readers to… vicariously relive through their reading a somewhat different past than the one shaped…through the reading of the deuteronomistic history, and for that matter, the Primary History’ (2009: 60). As a composition, it is ‘strongly shaped by the powerful sense of “ethnocultural” centrality that characterized the postmonarchic and most likely Persian-period works that eventually became included in the HB’ (2009: 77).

Others, in reconstructing the overall shape of Persian-period interactions with the biblical past, have drawn attention to the ramifications of the historiographical errors (and contradictions) in the account of the immediate aftermath of the Persian conquest in the book of Ezra. By contrast, there is also a growing consensus with respect to the plausibly historical character of the so-called ‘Nehemiah Memoir’, usually located in Neh. 1.1–7.5 and 12–13 (Grabbe 1998: 122-23, 152; Carr 2011: 205-208; Blenkinsopp 2001: 57). The combination of these factors, demonstrating that the late sixth and much of the fifth century bce were remembered rather poorly by biblical authors and that Jerusalem was apparently still essentially a ruin by the middle of the fifth century, suggests that scholars should look to the late fifth and early fourth centuries bce —and not the immediate aftermath of Cyrus’s conquest—for the major locus of the Yehudite ‘recovery’ of an Israelite past.

So, again, the major trends operating in the study of the Persian period today do not have as much to do with the uncovering of new data, although this has also occurred, as they do with the replacement of flawed models of tradition inheritance and representation with approaches more in tune with contemporary theorizing. As Wilson notes, the overall issue is not whether any biblical corpora contain material that dates to the Iron Age, as it seems clear that many do. Instead, it is that nevertheless their repetition in biblical form is primarily ‘representative of distinctly postmonarchic discursive formations’ (2016:6).

What now seems most necessary in confronting the biblical account of the past—as intimated in this article’s introductory discussion of theoretical trends—is the development of a new and more active model of the relationship between the history of biblical traditions and their construction into a comprehensive narrative account within a fairly limited time horizon by a fairly limited number of actors.

In this vein, Noll’s (2008) recent discussion of the flaws in typical approaches to doctrinal dissemination is very valuable. As he points out, despite nearly constant assumptions to the contrary, it is actually quite difficult to explain how biblical traditions would ever have reached most of the people who had lived in the region historically, and it now seems increasingly clear that many such traditions had not reached, for example, the Persian garrison at Elephantine. A similar discussion has also been produced by Davies, in a collection dealing generally with crucial issues in the writing of biblical literature (Davies 2014; Davies and Römer 2014). Obviously, what we can say about scribal culture, and when, must determine in large part how we reconstruct the reception of biblical and pre‐biblical texts throughout Israelite and Judahite history.

Michael Satlow (2014) has recently drawn attention to how very long it was before the Hebrew Bible was, in his term, ‘holy’, by which he means not just canonized but treated with the respect appropriate to scripture as an ultimate authority and as something that could no longer be altered. The late frontier of the former has been acknowledged consistently for some time, but the importance of the late date of the latter is just now beginning to be appreciated.

Towards that end, Eva Mroczek’s (2015; 2016) recent studies of extra-biblical literary culture, demonstrating its considerable creativity with respect to biblical subjects well into periods in which, in her term, the ‘hegemony of the biblical’ had been presumed, is of special importance.

Thomas Römer (2012) has also studied the possibility that biblical narratives were influenced by the wider world of Jewish textuality in later periods. In other words, neither the worlds of biblical textuality nor extrabiblical textuality were closed to each other or clearly dominated by the other until much later than has typically been supposed.

Not only do these studies represent crucial developments with respect to thinking about the Persian period and its literature, they are also intimations of where this field of study is generally likely to go. We will and must keep grappling with what it means that the biblical vision of history was ultimately created in a specific context, for a specific set of reasons; that it would not have matched everyone’s vision of the same history at that time or previously; and that, once completed, it did not immediately (or quickly) become the pre‐eminent account of  Israelite history. What this will do to how we tell the history—rather histories—of Israel is just now coming into view.

A História de Israel e Judá na pesquisa atual IV

:. A História de Israel e Judá na pesquisa atual I
:. A História de Israel e Judá na pesquisa atual II
:. A História de Israel e Judá na pesquisa atual III
:. A História de Israel e Judá na pesquisa atual IV
:. A História de Israel e Judá na pesquisa atual V

TOBOLOWSKY, A. Israelite and Judahite History in Contemporary Theoretical Approaches. Currents in Biblical Research, Vol. 17(1), 2018, p. 33-58.

Este artigo de Andrew Tobolowsky, História israelita e judaíta em abordagens acadêmicas contemporâneas, analisa a evolução do estudo das histórias de Israel e Judá, com ênfase nos últimos dez anos. Durante esse período, tem havido um interesse crescente em evidências extrabíblicas como o principal meio de construir histórias abrangentes, e um renascimento do interesse em teorias pós-modernas. Este estudo oferece uma discussão geral sobre as tendências da última década, considerando a possibilidade dos autores judaítas só terem assumido uma identidade israelita após a queda de Israel [= reino do norte]. Depois de mostrar as principais tendências nos estudos da Bíblia e da História de Israel de modo genérico, o autor aborda o período pré-monárquico, a monarquia unida, os dois reinos de Israel e Judá e o exílio babilônico e, por fim, a época persa.

This article surveys developments in the study of the histories of ancient Israel and Judah with a focus on the last ten years. Over that period there has been an increased focus on extrabiblical evidence, over biblical text, as the primary means of constructing comprehensive histories, and a revival of interest in post-modern and linguistic-turn theories with respect to establishing what kinds of histories should be written. This study offers a general discussion of the last decade’s trends; an inquiry into the possibility that Judahite authors only assumed an Israelite identity after the fall of Israel; and an era-by-era investigation of particular developments in how scholars think about the various traditional periods of Israelite and Judahite history. The latter inquiry spans the pre-monarchical period to the Persian period.

Andrew Tobolowsky: Visiting Assistant Professor at the College of William and Mary in Williamsburg, Virginia, USA.

Sempre que o assunto tiver sido tratado em minha página, Ayrton’s Biblical Page, ou neste blog, Observatório Bíblico, colocarei um link. As principais obras citadas terão links para a Amazon.com.br. O texto em português é um resumo e uma tradução livre minha. O texto em inglês na parte final do post é citação do artigo. A publicação será feita em 5 postagens.

LIVERANI, M. Para além da Bíblia: História antiga de Israel. São Paulo: Loyola/Paulus, 2008.

4. Os dois reinos, Israel e Judá, e o exílio babilônico – The Period of the Dual Monarchies and the Exile

Qual pesquisador ousaria, cinquenta anos atrás, escrever uma história que resgata o reino “esquecido” de Israel Norte como uma realidade totalmente distinta e independente de Judá? A falência da ideia de uma monarquia unida, vista no item anterior, ajudou a encaminhar a pesquisa nesta direção. Quer um bom exemplo? Israel Finkelstein em seu livro Le Royaume biblique oublié, de 2013, em francês, publicado no mesmo ano também em inglês como The Forgotten Kingdom: The Archaeology and History of Northern Israel, e em português, em 2015, como O reino esquecido: arqueologia e história de Israel Norte. A mesma coisa pode ser dita de Daniel E. Fleming, 2012.

Abordagens que usam fontes extrabíblicas, especialmente neo-assírias, são as que mais claramente recuperam Israel Norte como um lugar historicamente distinto de Judá. Assim Mario Liverani, em 2003 [Para além da Bíblia: História antiga de Israel. São Paulo: Loyola/Paulus, 2008] e Axel Knauf & Philippe Guillaume, 2016.

Muitos ensaios apresentados em congressos têm sido publicados. Por exemplo, as obras coordenadas por Lester L. Grabbe, em 2007 e 2011, resultantes das discussões do Seminário Europeu sobre Metodologia Histórica que durou 16 anos reunindo um grupo seleto de especialistas e que abordou algumas das questões mais importantes da História de Israel [confira as muitas publicações do Seminário nesta bibliografia aqui]. Sem nos esquecermos das várias obras do próprio Lester L. Grabbe, como, por exemplo, Ancient Israel: What Do We Know and How Do We Know It? London: T & T Clark, 2007 [Revised Edition: 2017].

Valiosas contribuições sobre os séculos X e IX a.C. estão também na obra coordenada por H. G. M. Williamson, em 2007. Para o século VII a.C., vale conferir os estudos de C. L. Crouch, publicados em 2014 (aqui e aqui).

Para a época do exílio e além, Oded Lipschits publicou, com outros autores, uma série de estudos sobre Judá e os judeus da época neobabilônica (2003 e 2005) e da época persa (2006 e 2011). Ainda sobre o exílio e a restauração: Brad E. Kelle et alii, 2011; Gary N. Knoppers et alii, 2009; Bob Becking et alii, 2009.

É importante notar que o mito da terra vazia foi denunciado em vários estudos. A ideia de que com o exílio dos judaítas para a Babilônia em 586 a.C. o território de Judá teria ficado vazio não se sustenta. Isto foi abordado desde 1996 por Hans M. Barstad. O tema voltou a ser tratado por ele, em 2008, e por outros, como Bob Becking et alii, em 2009; J. A. Middlemas, em 2009; Oded Lipschits &  J. Blenkinsopp, em 2003. O mito da terra vazia com a destruição do reino do norte em 722 a.C. também começa a ser estudado, como mostram M. Dijkstra & K. Vriezen, em 2014.

Finalmente, para terminar este item, o autor chama a atenção para o estudo de Uriah Y. Kim, Decolonizing Josiah: Toward a Postcolonial Reading of the Deuteronomistic History, de 2005. Ele denuncia a influência de nosso modo de fazer história moderna no Ocidente sobre o modo como entendemos a historiografia deuteronomista. O propósito do Deuteronomista jamais teria sido o de narrar os fatos tais como aconteceram, mas muito mais o de afirmar o espaço, talvez muito subjetivo, conquistado por Josias e sua corte no contexto do imperialismo assírio.

GRABBE, L. L. Ancient Israel: What Do We Know and How Do We Know It?. London: T&T Clark, 2007; Revised Edition: 2017, 352 p.

The importance of recognizing the separate aspects of Judah’s history and development, then, has also meant the importance of reassessing what we think we know about Israel. Finkelstein’s recent The Forgotten Kingdom is an example of this genre, since only contemporary approaches even permit the conclusion that the kingdom of Israel has been ‘forgotten’ (2013). The same can be said about Fleming’s The Legacy of Israel in Judah’s Bible (2012). The necessity of sorting through ‘Judah’s Bible’ for traces of inherited legacy is a thoroughly contemporary exigency that would hardly have occurred to scholars fifty years ago.

More commonly, the recovery of Israel as a historical place distinct from Judah has found its expression in so-called scientific approaches that pursue the Israelite kingdom through extrabiblical evidence and an outward-looking organizational frame in order to avoid the subjectivity of Judahite memories of Israel. Liverani’s treatment certainly reflects more significantly on the imperial background of Israelite history than many earlier histories did (2005: 143-202). Notably, Knauf and Guillaume begin their discussion of the monarchy with sections titled ‘Saul to Jeroboam I’ and ‘Omri to Jeroboam II’ but continue, after these, with ‘From Tiglath-Pileser to Ashurbanipal’ and ‘From Nabopolassar to Nebuchadnezzar’ (2016: 103-68).

Perhaps the most notable result of the growing recognition that we know less about both the dual monarchical period and the Judahite exile is the appearance in recent years of an extraordinary number of volumes of essays, often produced from conference proceedings, aimed in part at revisiting questions thathad once seemed settled. For the monarchical period, Grabbe has been a particularly important figure in terms of organizing and publishing these collections (Grabbe 2011; Becking and Grabbe 2011). The volume Ahab Agonistes is particularly worthy of note as a contribution to the study of the Omride period (Grabbe 2007a)… Grabbe himself has been particularly interested in how biblical scholars know what they know, what the evidence really allows, and what needs to be reassessed (Grabbe 1997; 2007b; 2007c; 2007d).

Another collection, organized by Williamson, Understanding the History of Ancient Israel, also presents a number of valuable contributions particularly towards greater understanding of the tenth and ninth centuries bce (2007).

For the seventh century bce, recent studies by Crouch of the ethnic dynamics of the entire region in that period, and their results especially for considering the formation of deuteronomistic materials, are also worthy of note and provide a counter‐weight to the increasing tendency to date most biblical material much later than had previously been supposed (2014a; 2014b).

For the exilic period and beyond, Lipschits has been a crucial figure as editor and author. Specifically, he has collaborated with a number of scholars on the production of a series of volumes, published by Eisenbrauns, dealing sequentially with the state of Judah and Judeans from the Neo-Babylonian period onwards (Lipschits and Blenkinsopp 2003a; Lipschits 2005; Lipschits, Oeming, and Knoppers 2011; Lipschits and Oeming 2006). Other important collections dealing with the exilic period include Interpreting Exile: Interdisciplinary Studies of Displacement and Deportation in Biblical and Modern Contexts (Kelle, Ames, and Wright 2011); Exile and Restoration Revisited: Essays on the Babylonian and Persian Periods in Memory of Peter R. Ackroyd (Knoppers, Grabbe, and Fulton 2009); and From Babylon to Eternity: The Exile Remembered and Constructed in Text and Tradition (Becking, Cannegieter, and van der Pol 2009).

In terms of general trends relating to the exilic period, one issue that seems likely to be of crucial importance going forward is the so-called Myth of the Empty Land—that is, the idea that all Judahites, or even all wealthy and influential Judahites, were exiled to Babylon between 597 and 586 bce , leaving the land empty. This has been recognized widely as a myth since at least the 1996 study of Hans M. Barstad, but has since received a number of useful treatments by Barstad and others exploring the ramifications (Barstad 1996; Becking, Cannegieter, and van der Pol 2009; Middlemas 2009; Lipschits and Blenkinsopp 2003b; Barstad 2008: 135-60). One new front, which will likely also be of increasing importance, is the recognition that the conquest of Israel in 722 bce also produced a myth of empty land, as explored in a study by Dijkstra and Vriezen (2014).

Finally, in dealing with the monarchical period and the exile generally, Uriah Y. Kim’s study, Decolonizing Josiah: Toward a Postcolonial Reading of the Deuteronomistic History deserves special mention (2005). This work asks crucial questions about the effects of viewing the Deuteronomistic History, and by extension other aspects of the biblical narrative, through a set of expectations conditioned and produced by western ways of thinking about histories and nations themselves (…) In this light, for example, the common assumption that the deuteronomistic historian would have diligently pursued archival material because the purpose of the history was to describe the past as accurately as possible is revealed as a projection of western concepts of history. As an alternative, Kim suggests noticing that ‘Josiah’s kingdom was located in the ideological landscape of Assyrian imperialism where it was viewed as other’ (2005: 206). The Deuteronomistic History may have been written in part to assert the subjectivity of Josiah and his court themselves.

A História de Israel e Judá na pesquisa atual III

:. A História de Israel e Judá na pesquisa atual I
:. A História de Israel e Judá na pesquisa atual II
:. A História de Israel e Judá na pesquisa atual III
:. A História de Israel e Judá na pesquisa atual IV
:. A História de Israel e Judá na pesquisa atual V

TOBOLOWSKY, A. Israelite and Judahite History in Contemporary Theoretical Approaches. Currents in Biblical Research, Vol. 17(1), 2018, p. 33-58.

Este artigo de Andrew Tobolowsky, História israelita e judaíta em abordagens acadêmicas contemporâneas, analisa a evolução do estudo das histórias de Israel e Judá, com ênfase nos últimos dez anos. Durante esse período, tem havido um interesse crescente em evidências extrabíblicas como o principal meio de construir histórias abrangentes, e um renascimento do interesse em teorias pós-modernas. Este estudo oferece uma discussão geral sobre as tendências da última década, considerando a possibilidade dos autores judaítas só terem assumido uma identidade israelita após a queda de Israel [= reino do norte]. Depois de mostrar as principais tendências nos estudos da Bíblia e da História de Israel de modo genérico, o autor aborda o período pré-monárquico, a monarquia unida, os dois reinos de Israel e Judá e o exílio babilônico e, por fim, a época persa.

This article surveys developments in the study of the histories of ancient Israel and Judah with a focus on the last ten years. Over that period there has been an increased focus on extrabiblical evidence, over biblical text, as the primary means of constructing comprehensive histories, and a revival of interest in post-modern and linguistic-turn theories with respect to establishing what kinds of histories should be written. This study offers a general discussion of the last decade’s trends; an inquiry into the possibility that Judahite authors only assumed an Israelite identity after the fall of Israel; and an era-by-era investigation of particular developments in how scholars think about the various traditional periods of Israelite and Judahite history. The latter inquiry spans the pre-monarchical period to the Persian period.

Andrew Tobolowsky: Visiting Assistant Professor at the College of William and Mary in Williamsburg, Virginia, USA.

Sempre que o assunto tiver sido tratado em minha página, Ayrton’s Biblical Page, ou neste blog, Observatório Bíblico, colocarei um link. As principais obras citadas terão links para a Amazon.com.br. O texto em português é um resumo e uma tradução livre minha. O texto em inglês na parte final do post é citação do artigo. A publicação será feita em 5 postagens.

FINKELSTEIN, I.; MAZAR, A. The Quest for the Historical Israel: Debating Archaeology and the History of Early Israel. Atlanta: Society of Biblical Literature, 2007, 220 p.

3. O Israel primitivo e a monarquia unida – Early Israel and the United Monarchy

Poucos estudiosos ainda dão algum valor histórico às narrativas bíblicas sobre épocas anteriores ao aparecimento de Israel em Canaã. São memórias vagas e distorcidas. As discussões sobre o período pré-monárquico também foram caracterizadas nos últimos anos por uma crescente hesitação em fazer afirmações concretas sobre a natureza das realidades étnicas anteriores à monarquia. Poucos duvidam de que a Estela de Merneptah seja uma forte evidência de que um grupo chamado Israel existia nas montanhas de Canaã já no começo da Idade do Ferro I, mas agora há um acordo quase unânime de que esse Israel era apenas um dos muitos grupos ativos naquela região e naquela época. Assim, por exemplo, Daniel E. Fleming, 2012; Amihai Mazar, 2007; Ann E. Killebrew, 2005. No entanto, enquanto para alguns essa maneira de pensar sobre etnia geralmente significa que um Israel pré-monárquico é muito difícil de ser reconstruído, para outros este “proto-Israel” está claramente relacionado com o Israel monárquico.

A controvérsia sobre a monarquia unida começou quando Israel Finkelstein publicou, em 1996, um estudo sobre as datações feitas com radiocarbono em vários sítios arqueológicos importantes da região, propondo o que se convencionou chamar de “cronologia baixa“. Ou seja: o que se atribuía ao século XI é da metade do século X e o que era datado na época de Salomão deve ser visto como pertencendo ao século IX a.C. Isto gerou grande debate no meio acadêmico e numerosos estudos foram publicados. Posições a favor e contra podem ser vistas no livro de 2007 que traz o debate entre Israel Finkelstein e Amihai Mazar. Esta é uma área complexa, pois envolve detalhes técnicos sobre datação por radiocarbono, difíceis para quem não é especialista. E também porque as discordâncias de Finkelstein e Mazar são sobre as interpretações dos dados e não sobre os dados em si.

Enfim, a “cronologia baixa” de Finkelstein sugere que não existiu uma monarquia unida, enquanto a “cronologia convencional modificada” de Mazar sugere uma monarquia unida na forma de um Estado incipiente e não um poderoso reino como diz a narrativa bíblica. Lembrando que muitos estudiosos têm se posicionado sobre esta questão com soluções variadas. Como Mahri Leonard-Fleckman em 2016 e Ze’ev Herzog & Lily Singer-Avitz em 2006. 

Como Megan Bishop Moore e Brad E. Kelle observaram em 2011, não há evidência clara de Davi ou de sua atividade fora da Bíblia. Se ele existiu, terá sido apenas mais um chefe local na região montanhosa da Judeia. Talvez um dia Davi desapareça da história como desapareceram patriarcas, matriarcas e êxodo, mas atualmente ele continua a ser tratado pelos historiadores como um personagem real, embora bem menor do que aparece nos relatos bíblicos.

O personagem Davi e seu papel na literatura bíblica, muito mais do que o Davi histórico, tem ocupado alguns pesquisadores, como Ian D. Wilson em 2016. Ou a Jerusalém da época de Davi, como Daniel Pioske em 2015. Sem esquecer John Van Seters que, em 2009, investiga as razões da reinvenção da saga de Davi por autores da época persa.

MOORE, M. B.; KELLE, B. E. Biblical History and Israel’s Past: The Changing Study of the Bible and History. Grand Rapids, MI: Eerdmans, 2011, xvii + 518 p.

Very few scholars suggest that biblical descriptions of the periods prior to the appearance of Israel in Canaan contain more than vague, distorted memories, and potentially nothing of historical value. Discussions of the pre-monarchical period have also been characterized in recent years primarily by a growing hesitance to make concrete assertions about the nature of ethnic realities prior to the monarchy. Few doubt that the Merneptah Stele is hard evidence that a group called Israel existed in the highlands of Canaan already by the beginning of the Iron I, but there is now nearly as universal an agreement that Israel was only one of many groups active in that region and time (Fleming 2012: 254; Mazar 2007a:91; K. Sparks 1998: 11; Killebrew 2005). However, while for Fleming, Miller, and others, this and new ways of thinking about ethnicity generally mean that, in Miller’s words, a ‘pre-monarchic Israel’ is ‘simply too difficult to reconstruct with any confidence’ (J. Miller 2008: 176). For many others, this ‘proto-Israel’ is clearly related to monarchical Israel in crucial and foundational ways (Faust 2006: 173; R. Miller 2004: 63; Killebrew 2005).

As for the united monarchy, the current controversy began with the 1996 publication of the first major radiocarbon study of key sites by Finkelstein (1996). These findings have particularly to do with the date of the first Iron IIA foundations in the lowlands of Israel, which was traditionally set at around 1000 bce and attributed to the building programs of David and Solomon (see especially Yadin 1970). Finkelstein and Mazar are perhaps the individuals most associated with what seem currently to be the best accepted rival positions, and a valuable collection of their thoughts on each period has recently been produced by Schmidt (Mazar and Finkelstein 2007). Mazar and Finkelstein (and others associated with each position) have produced a voluminous body of scholarship over the last ten years that is hard to address for two reasons. First, much of their work has advanced alongside a series of radiocarbon studies, some of which they have been personally involved with and some not, whose science is difficult for the non-specialist to grasp and that in any case can only offer ranges of dates that often start in periods that might suggest one conclusion and end in periods that suggest another. Second, Mazar and Finkelstein frequently agree, at least broadly speaking, on the hard facts, but disagree about their subjective interpretation.

At present, the latest iteration of Finkelstein’s ‘Low Chronology’ suggests that there was no united monarchy, that the crucial Iron IIA period did not begin until around 920 bce , with a second and larger phase beginning already in the early ninth century, and that the urban foundations associated with David and Solomon were instead built by the Omrides (Finkelstein 2013: 7-8; 2010). Mazar acknowledges much of the same evidence, with slightly earlier radiocarbon dates, but his ‘Modified Conventional Chronology’ nevertheless argues for various reasons that the Iron IIA began around 980 bce , and that the united monarchy was ‘a state in an early stage of evolution, far from the rich and widely expanding state portrayed in the biblical narrative’, but nevertheless a puissant regional force (Mazar and Finkelstein 2007: 122; Mazar 2010: 52).

There are, of course, plenty of other scholars who have by now contributed to this debate. We can single out for notice the recent studies of Leonard-Fleckman (2016) and Herzog and Singer-Avitz (2004; 2006).

Generally, then, as Moore and Kelle note, it is the case that there is no clear evidence of David or his activity outside the Bible, and it now seems that if he existed, ‘the long view of archaeology indicates that David may have been one in a line of many highland chieflike rulers’ (2011: 242-43). As they also note, however, while someday David ‘may disappear from histories in the same way the patriarchs, the matriarchs, and the exodus have done’, at present the vast majority of historians continue to describe David as a real historical figure who did something similar to what the Bible says he did, if most often in rather reduced form (2011: 242-43).

What one might call a ‘third way’ in contemporary history is, however, well-represented in discussion of David, Jerusalem, and his monarchy as well. The treatments of Wilson and Pioske, Kingship and Memory in Ancient Judah and David’s Jerusalem: Between Memory and History, belong under this heading (Wilson 2016; Pioske 2015). In both cases, as the titles suggest, the question of David’s historicity and the historicity of his rule are entertained, but are very much secondary to inquiries into the role memories of both play in biblical literature and beyond, especially in the period in which the biblical account was taking shape.

John Van Seters’s investigation into the biblical story of David’s life also deserves mention alongside these (2009)…This book is most valuable as an inquiry into the ways David’s story may have been utterly reinvented by Persian-period authors, and the reasons they may have done so.