Notícias interessantes de arqueologia e outros assuntos

Três artigos sobre uma escavação arqueológica na Palestina

::  More on the Sharafat excavation – By Jim Davila: PaleoJudaica –  March 29, 2019

Archaeologists Find Tomb of the Richest of the Rich in Second Temple-era Jerusalem. The Jewish villagers seem to have done very well for themselves from exporting olive oil and wine 2,000 years ago, though what they did with their pigeons is anyone’s guess.

:: Large Hasmonean-era agricultural village found under Jerusalem Arab neighborhood – By Amanda Borschel-Dan: The Times of Israel – 27 March 2019

Impressive, multi-generation burial chamber and large dovecote point to well-heeled settlement in rural area, near today’s Biblical Zoo.

:: Impressive Jewish artifacts found in Arab neighborhood of Jerusalem – By Ben Bresky: The Jerusalem Post – March 28, 2019

2,000-year-old olive and wine presses, a burial cave and mikvah from the descendants of the Maccabees were found in south Jerusalem neighborhood.


Esta notícia é sobre microrganismos no Mar Morto



:: Ancient Microbes Ate Each Other’s Corpses to Survive Beneath the Dead Sea – By Brandon Specktor: Live Science – March 26, 2019

On its salty surface, the Dead Sea is famous for making giddy tourists float like beach balls. Hundreds of feet below the water, however, life is a little less fun. There, choked by some of the saltiest water on Earth, single-celled microorganisms called archaea struggle to carry out life’s basic functions without oxygen, light or fresh forms of sustenance. According to a new study published March 22 in the journal Geology, the survival of microbial life beneath the Dead Sea may have once even depended on eating the dead.

Enquanto esta é sobre manuscritos

:: Cambridge University and Vatican manuscripts made public online – BBC News – 28 March 2019

Hundreds of medieval Greek manuscripts held by Cambridge and Heidelberg universities and the Vatican are to be made available to the public online. The £1.6m project will digitise more than 800 volumes featuring the works of Plato and Aristotle, among others. The manuscripts date from the early Christian period to the early modern era (about 1500 – 1700 AD). Cambridge University said the two-year project would open up “some of the most important manuscripts” to the world. Works set to be digitised include “classical texts and some of the most important treatises on religion, mathematics, history, drama and philosophy”, a university spokesman said. The manuscripts are currently held at the university library, 12 of its colleges, the Fitzwilliam Museum in Cambridge, Heidelberg University Library in Germany and the Vatican Library in Rome.

Sobre a arqueologia da Palestina

Biblical Archaeology: The Study of Biblical Sites & Artifacts

By Owen Jarus, Live Science Contributor | February 22, 2019

While the definition of biblical archaeology varies from scholar to scholar, it generally includes some combination of archaeology and biblical studies (…) “Specifically, it is archaeology that sheds light on the stories, descriptions, and discussions in the Hebrew Bible and the New Testament from the early second millennium [B.C.], the time of Abraham and the Patriarchs, through the Roman period in the early first millennium [A.D.],” Cline wrote in his book “Biblical Archaeology: A Very Short Introduction” (Oxford University Press, 2009). Some scholars extend the geographical area that biblical archaeology covers to include Egypt, Mesopotamia and Sudan (…)  Some archaeologists prefer not to use the phrase “biblical archaeology” out of concern that it sounds unscientific (continua).

Eu sou Assurbanípal: exposição no Museu Britânico

I am Ashurbanipal is at the British Museum, London, from 8 November 2018 to 24 February 2019.

Assurbanípal, rei da Assíria (668-627 a.C.)

King Ashurbanipal of Assyria (r. 669–c. 631 BC) was the most powerful man on earth. He described himself in inscriptions as ‘king of the world’, and his reign from the city of Nineveh (now in northern Iraq) marked the high point of the Assyrian empire, which stretched from the shores of the eastern Mediterranean to the mountains of western Iran (…) This major exhibition tells the story of Ashurbanipal through the British Museum’s unparalleled collection of Assyrian treasures and rare loans. Step into Ashurbanipal’s world through displays that evoke the splendour of his palace, with its spectacular sculptures, sumptuous furnishings and exotic gardens. Marvel at the workings of Ashurbanipal’s great library, the first in the world to be created with the ambition of housing all knowledge under one roof. Come face to face with one of history’s greatest forgotten kings.

:: Leia sobre Assurbanípal aqui, aqui e aqui.

:: Leia sobre a exposição:

I Am Ashurbanipal at the British Museum – Cathleen Chopra-McGowan – Bible History Daily: 01/30/2019

‘Some of the most appalling images ever created’ – I Am Ashurbanipal review – Jonathan Jones – The Guardian: Tue 6 Nov 2018

Descobertas arqueológicas importantes para entender a Bíblia

Vale pelas listas. Entretanto, o enfoque, arqueologia bíblica, precisa ser filtrado. Além do que, listas de “10 mais” raramente escapam da subjetividade.

Como observou Jim Davila, em 30 de janeiro de 2019, no post Top ten archaeological discoveries relating to Hebrew Bible? “Overall this is a pretty good list, although I do not endorse some of the interpretations put on the finds” [No geral, esta é uma boa lista, embora eu não apoie algumas das interpretações dadas aos achados arqueológicos].

Pois:

A ‘História de Israel’ está mudando. O consenso foi rompido. A paráfrase racionalista do texto bíblico que constituía a base dos manuais de ‘História de Israel’ não é mais aceita. A sequência patriarcas, José do Egito, escravidão, êxodo, conquista da terra, confederação tribal, império davídico-salomônico, divisão entre norte e sul, exílio e volta para a terra está despedaçada. O uso dos textos bíblicos como fonte para a ‘História de Israel’ é questionado por muitos. A arqueologia ampliou suas perspectivas e falar de ‘arqueologia bíblica’ hoje é proibido: existe uma ‘arqueologia da Palestina’, ou uma ‘arqueologia da Síria/Palestina’ ou mesmo uma ‘arqueologia do Levante’ (SILVA, A. J. A História de Israel no debate atual – Última atualização: 24.10.2018).

:: Top Ten Discoveries in Biblical Archaeology Relating to the Old Testament – By Windlebry: Bible Archaeology Report – January 12, 2019

Crônica Babilônica que menciona a tomada de Jerusalém em 597 a.C.

:: Top Ten Discoveries in Biblical Archaeology Relating to the New Testament – By Windlebry: Bible Archaeology Report – January 19, 2019

TIBERIEVM PON]TIVS PILATVS PRAEF]ECTUS IVDA[EA]E - Inscrição de Cesareia - Museu de Israel, Jerusalém


Leia Mais:
Arqueologia no Observatório Bíblico

A frenética busca por textos sagrados

Inside the cloak-and-dagger search for sacred texts – By Robert Draper: National Geographic – December 2018

In the shadowy world where religion meets archaeology, scientists, collectors, and schemers are racing to find the most precious relics.

Jim Davila, em PaleoJudaica.com, observa:

This is a very good article that deals with most of the recent stories about Bible-related (etc.) manuscripts, whether genuine or fake. These include Operation Scroll, which continues; Konstantin von Tischendorf and Codex Sinaiticus; the Sisters of Sinai and Codex Sinaiticus Syriacus; the Oxyrhynchus papyri; the Dead Sea Scrolls; P52, the Rylands fragment of the Gospel of John; the Museum of the Bible’s fake Dead Sea Scrolls fragments and Hobby Lobby’s improperly acquired cuneiform tablets; the no-longer-first-century fragment of the Gospel of Mark; and more.

Khirbet el-Qom

RIP: Reading Obituaries in Ancient Judah – By Alice Mandell and Jeremy Smoak: The Ancient Near East Today – November 2018

Recent archaeological studies are beginning to shed greater light on the role that the senses play in human experience and religion. They argue that we need to move away from the tendency to treat sight and sound as the “higher senses” and touch, smell, and taste as the “lower senses.” This is why it is helpful to step back and imagine encountering inscriptions in their original settings. James Watts reminds us that ancient Israelite audiences were drawn to texts for their iconic, performative, and visual characteristics. Some inscriptions were installed as decorations or media within ritual spaces both inside and outside lived communities.

The story of the two stone tablets that YHWH gives Moses demonstrates how texts could become monuments around which communities constructed lives and politics. These tablets are hidden away in the ark and yet they play a pivotal role in Israel’s social and religious evolution. Ancient Hebrew texts “spoke” much more than their mere words—they signaled boundaries, access points, power dynamics, and social relations. And, they often communicated nuanced shades of meaning based upon different seasons, different times of day, and different audiences.

One set of inscriptions that illustrates the multi-sensory value of texts is from the tombs at Khirbet el-Qom, located several miles west of Hebron in the southern part of the territory of Judah. During the excavations of the tombs almost forty years ago, William G. Dever discovered several inscriptions written in Old Hebrew script on the walls of each tomb.

Leia Mais:
Iahweh e Asherá em Kuntillet ‘Ajrud

Senet: jogo de tabuleiro do Egito antigo

O Senet é um dos mais antigos jogos de tabuleiro conhecidos. Senet, cujo nome significa “Jogo de Passagem” era um jogo de tabuleiro egípcio, dos períodos pré-dinástico e antigo, extremamente popular em todas as camadas da sociedade. Muitos historiadores creem que este seja um antepassado do gamão. O mais antigo hieróglifo representando um jogo de Senet é datado entre 3500 e 3100 a.C., o que faz dele o jogo de tabuleiro mais antigo registado pelo homem. Tabuleiros de aproximadamente 2650 a.C. estão registrados em tumbas egípcias. Nunca foram encontradas regras para o Senet, seja em papiros ou em paredes de tumbas. Acredita-se que, pelo fato de ter sido tão popular, ele tenha sido ensinado exclusivamente de um jogador para outro, sem necessidade de regras escritas. Ainda assim, com base em pinturas do jogo em tumbas, nas referências feitas a ele na escrita egípcia e olhando para os seus descendentes modernos, como o gamão, historiadores criaram o que se acredita ser a mais próxima reconstrução das regras de Senet.

Tabuleiro de Senet em faiança, gravado para Amenhotep III (ca. 1390-1353 a.C.) - Museu do Brooklyn, New York

:: Senet: Play Store (Android)
Há mais de uma opção. Testei este jogo aqui.  Após entrar no jogo, clique no ponto de exclamação  !  para ver um tutorial de como jogar.

:: Senet: LuduScience
Site em português de Portugal. Além de breve apresentação, as regras podem ser baixadas em formato pdf. Confira, no menu, outros jogos antigos em “Jogos tradicionais”.

:: Como jogar Senet: Mitra Criações
Vídeo que ensina regras possíveis para o Senet. Publicado em 26 de março de 2016. Em português.

:: Senet: Board and Pieces
Site sobre jogos abstratos. História da descoberta do jogo e explicação detalhada, com desenhos, de como jogar. Há, neste site, uma bibliografia. Em inglês.

:: Senet – Game of 30 Squares: Ancient Games
Site de Eli Gurevich. História do jogo e explicação de como jogar. Há também um blog sobre jogos antigos. Em inglês.

:: The Rules of Senet: Masters Traditional Games
Traz as regras do jogo e suas variações, discutindo duas ou três possibilidades. Há regras para vários jogos tradicionais de tabuleiro aqui. Confira também a página Ancient & Historical Board Games. Em inglês.

:: 98 imagens de Senet: Blog de Dmitriy Skiryuk (Дмитрий Скирюк)
Estas imagens estão no blog de Dmitriy Skiryuk, um reconstrutor russo de jogos. As legendas podem ser traduzidas do russo para o português com o auxílio do Google Tradutor.

:: How Senet Works: HowStuffWorks
Como o Senet funciona? Texto de Laurie L. Dove. Publicado em 4 de abril de 2012. Em inglês.

Senet de Tutankhamon (ca. 1332–1323 a.C.) - Museu Egípcio do Cairo

Trecho de PICCIONE, P. A. In Search of the Meaning of Senet. Archaeology, vol. 33, n. 4 – July/August 1980 – p. 55-58 [em pdf aqui]:

Senet began as a, strictly secular game and its evolution can be analyzed in a practical as well as mystical sense. Historically, senet made it first known appearance in the Third Dynasty mastaba or tomb of Hesy-re, the overseer of the royal scribes of King Djoser at Saqqara, dating to approximately 2686 BC. Unidentified senet-like boards have also been found in Predynastic and First Dynasty burials at Abydos and Saqqara and date to about 3500-3100 BC. These and a number of First Dynasty (3100 BC) senet board hieroglyphics indicate that the game may be even older. Annotated depictions of people playing the game also appear on the walls of later Old Kingdom (2686-2160 BC) mastabas among other daily life scenes

Trecho de CRIST, W. ; DUNN-VATURI, A-E ; DE VOOGT, A. Ancient Egyptians at Play: Board Games Across Borders. London: Bloomsbury, 2016, 232 p. – ISBN 9781474221177:

Perhaps the best-known board game from ancient Egypt, senet, also appears in the offering list in Prince Rahotep’s tomb. As it was for mehen, this is the oldest known inscription offering the name of this game that is well attested in New Kingdom contexts. Much like mehen, this game also appears to have held strong connotations with the afterlife. The word zn.t means “passing” in Egyptian, and though any specific religious meaning the game may have held is unclear before the New Kingdom, its name does suggest at least a similar connection with the passing of the ba through the duat that is made explicit in the Book of the Dead. Piccione believes the full name of the game, zn.t n.t hb, “the passing game,” comes from the nature of gameplay where the pieces pass each other on the board. A canonical senet board is between 12 and 55 cm long, laid out in three rows of ten playing spaces, often with certain spaces marked, likely indicating a special outcome during the play of the game, as is shown below. Piccione points out that the name senet is only directly attributed to this pattern of spaces in the New Kingdom, and that Egyptologists have assumed that, when it appears in earlier texts, it refers to the same game. Without any evidence to suggest the name was once used for a different game, it is Piccione’s judgment the name senet referred to the same game in the Old and Middle Kingdoms as it did in the New Kingdom. The origins of senet in Egypt are confusing as there are no intact game boards that date before the Fifth Dynasty, though fragmentary boards, playing pieces and textual and representational art have been found to suggest its earlier existence (…) Toward the end of the Second Intermediate Period [nota: 1640-1550 a.C. – dinastias XV-XVII], senet game boxes appear in the archaeological record, though they probably existed earlier. While senet only appears in the material record as slabs or graffiti prior to the Second Intermediate Period, beginning in the Seventeenth Dynasty game boxes start to appear in Egypt.

Leia Mais:
Jogo Real de Ur

Jogo Real de Ur

O Jogo Real de Ur foi encontrado nas escavações feitas na cidade mesopotâmica de Ur pelo arqueólogo britânico Sir Leonard Woolley na década de vinte do século passado. Um dos tabuleiros encontra-se no Museu Britânico, em Londres, desde 1928. Foi datado como sendo de aproximadamente 2500 a.C. e pertence à cultura suméria.

Jogo Real de Ur - The Royal Game of Ur  (The British Museum)

:: Jogo Real de Ur – The Royal Game of Ur: Play Store (Android)
Há mais de uma opção. Testei este jogo aqui.  Após entrar no jogo, clique no ponto de exclamação  para ver um tutorial de como jogar.

:: Jogo Real de Ur: LuduScience
Site em português de Portugal. Além de breve apresentação, as regras podem ser baixadas em formato pdf. Confira, no menu, outros jogos antigos em “Jogos tradicionais”.

:: The Royal Game of Ur: The British Museum
Site do Museu Britânico. Apresentação do jogo, descrição da descoberta, imagens do jogo, bibliografia. Em inglês.

:: The Royal Game of Ur: Board and Pieces
Site sobre jogos abstratos. História da descoberta do jogo e explicação detalhada, com desenhos, de como jogar. Há, neste site, uma bibliografia. Em inglês.

:: Royal Game of Ur – Game of 20 Squares: Ancient Games
Site de Eli Gurevich. História do jogo e explicação de como jogar. Há também um blog sobre jogos antigos. Em inglês.

:: The Rules of the Royal Game of Ur: Masters Traditional Games
Traz as regras do jogo e suas variações, discutindo duas ou três possibilidades. Há regras para vários jogos tradicionais de tabuleiro aqui. Confira também a página Ancient & Historical Board Games. Em inglês.

:: Deciphering the world’s oldest rule book – Irving Finkel: The British Museum
Vídeo em inglês, com legendas em português, no qual o curador do Museu Britânico Irving Finkel conta como encontrou e traduziu as regras do Jogo Real de Ur. Publicado em 23 de novembro de 2015.

:: Tom Scott vs Irving Finkel: The Royal Game of Ur: The British Museum
Vídeo em inglês, com legendas em português, onde podemos ver Irving Finkel e Tom Scott jogando o Jogo Real de Ur no Museu Britânico. Publicado em 28 de abril de 2017.

:: Irving Finkel, On the Rules for the Royal Game of Ur: Academia.edu
Sobre as regras do Jogo Real de Ur: texto do livro de FINKEL , I. Ancient Board Games in Perspective: Papers from the 1990 British Museum Colloquium. London: British Museum Press, 2007, 352 p.  ISBN 9780714111537. Confira o livro na Amazon aqui. O texto está disponível para download em Academia.edu. É bastante técnico, porém. Em inglês.

:: 126 imagens do Jogo Real de Ur: Blog de Dmitriy Skiryuk (Дмитрий Скирюк)
Estas imagens estão no blog de Dmitriy Skiryuk, um reconstrutor russo de jogos. As legendas podem ser traduzidas do russo para o português com o auxílio do Google Tradutor.

:: BELL, R. C. Board and Table Games from Many Civilizations. Mineola, NY: Dover Publications, 2012, 464 p. – ISBN 9780486238555
Um livro muito elogiado sobre jogos de tabuleiro. Em inglês.

Leia Mais:
Histórias de criação e dilúvio na antiga Mesopotâmia
Histórias do Antigo Oriente Médio: uma bibliografia

Bíblia e arqueologia: uma introdução

RICHELLE, M. A Bíblia e a Arqueologia. São Paulo: Vida Nova, 2017, 176 p. – ISBN 9788527506892.

RICHELLE, M. A Bíblia e a Arqueologia. São Paulo: Vida Nova, 2017, 176 p.

 
As descobertas arqueológicas apresentadas na mídia tanto confirmam a Bíblia quanto a contradizem. O que essas descobertas significam de fato? O que essas escavações arqueológicas e as inscrições antigas nos ensinam? O que pensar das controvérsias recentes sobre a época de Davi e Salomão? O autor mostra como a arqueologia pode contribuir para uma melhor compreensão da bíblia no contexto do mundo antigo. A proposta deste livro é avaliar o tema com cuidado, mas de maneira simples e bem informada.

Dans les médias, les découvertes archéologiques sont tantôt présentées comme confirmant la Bible, tantôt comme la contredisant. Qu’en est-il exactement ? Que nous apprennent les fouilles archéologiques et les inscriptions anciennes ? Que penser des controverses récentes sur l’époque de David et Salomon ? Ce livre propose de faire le point sur le sujet, de manière simple mais informée.

O original, em francês, é de 2012. Uma avaliação da versão, expandida, em língua inglesa, de 2018, feita por Jim West, pode ser lida em The Bible & Archaeology.

Matthieu Richelle é Doutor em Ciências Históricas e Filológicas pela EPHE-Sorbonne e ex-aluno da Escola Bíblica e Arqueológica Francesa de Jerusalém. Professor de Antigo Testamento na Faculdade Livre de Teologia Evangélica de Vaux-sur-Seine, França.

As descobertas mais importantes da arqueologia israelense

ToI asks the experts: What are the most important finds of Israeli archaeology? – By Amanda Borschel-Dan – Times of Israel: April 19, 2018

From Dead Sea Scrolls to space-age tech, the dramatic history of the ever-developing field is indelibly entwined with that of the nation itself

Grutas de Qumran

Observa hoje Jim Davila em seu blog PaleoJudaica:

This article is not another top-ten list. It is much more nuanced and sophisticated. You should read it all.

Este artigo não é apenas outra lista das dez mais importantes descobertas feitas por arqueólogos israelenses. É muito mais elaborado. Vale a pena a leitura.